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VSU Founder's Day

Published date: February 27, 2013

Avis A. Jones DeWeeverAvis A. Jones-DeWeever, Ph.D., Executive Director of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW), the nation’s oldest organization dedicated to the advancement of both civil rights and women’s rights, will highlight the commemoration of Virginia State University’s 131th Anniversary at the University’s annual Founder’s Day on Wednesday, March 13. The program will begin in Virginia Hall’s Anderson-Turner Auditorium at 4 p.m. The Convocation is free and open to the public.

Dr. Jones-DeWeever’s career spans stints at several highly esteemed organizations including the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, and the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.  At the NCNW Dr. Jones-DeWeever is able to merge her interest in both race and gender on behalf of producing broad-scale social change. Before becoming Executive Director, she served as the Director of NCNW’s Research and Public Policy Division.

An accomplished scholar, writer, political commentator and public speaker, Dr. Jones-DeWeever is an authority on race and gender in the American economy; poverty in urban communities; inequality of educational and economic opportunity; and issues of privilege, power, and policy.  In addition to her written contributions, Dr. Jones-DeWeever is a highly sought-after political commentator and public speaker. Her policy perspectives have been shared through a variety of media outlets including:  CNN, PBS, BET News, Voice of America Television, the Canadian Television News Channel and National Public Radio. She was the Keynote Speaker for President of the Unites States’ Young African Leaders Forum.

Dr. Jones-DeWeever is a 1990 graduate of VSU. She earned a Ph.D. in Government and Politics from the University of Maryland, College Park. 

Alfred W. Harris founded present-day Virginia State University in 1882.  It was then known as Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute, the nation’s first, fully state-assisted, college for blacks.  Today, VSU has grown into a global, comprehensive, four-year institution of nearly 6,000 students. Students can earn degrees in 52 undergraduate and graduate programs.

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